So How Do I Look?

    Professionalism – the expertness characteristic of a professional person

    expertise, expertness – skillfulness by virtue of possessing special knowledge

    Source: The Free Dictionary

    ———————

So how do I look?

    A ‘true’ professional must be proficient in all criteria for the field of work they are practicing professionally in. Criteria include following:

    1. Academic qualifications – i.e., university college/institute

    2. Expert and specialized knowledge in field which one is practicing professionally

    3. Excellent manual/practical & literary skills in relation to profession

    4. High quality work in (examples): creations, products, services, presentations, consultancy, primary/other research, administrative, marketing or other work endeavors

    5. A high standard of professional ethics, behavior and work activities while carrying out one’s profession (as an employee, self-employed person, career, enterprise, business, company, or partnership/associate/colleague, etc.)

    * Also taking into consideration natural & harnessed talents integrated & used with qualifications & when doing work in professional capacity. These talents & skills are just as important in any forms of work be it paid, unpaid, volunteer, domestic jobs or any other work.

    Source: Wikipedia

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So how do I look?

So how do I look?

WardBunny posted a blog in response to an article from Nurse Connect titled, Do Tattoos Reflect Professionalism?

The article was disturbing to me on many levels. Somehow this article proposes and postulates that a patients confidence in one’s professional abilities can be compromised by the health care professional having tattoos. And that ‘older’ patients ‘frown’ upon tattoos?

At the beginning of this post I listed a couple sources I found on the internet regarding Professionalism and being a Professional. And no where did I find any information on one’s skin detracting from one’s abilities as a professional.

I agree, I think clothes do make the man(or woman). I believe we should dress for success. I feel that personal hygiene is a staple of conduct for any professional.

I however disagree that possessing a tattoo compromises your professionalism.

The problem with the public, professional and non-professional, is the assumptions that are made when correlating tattoos with the stigmatisms and stereotypes that the media and movies have fed us.

    Tattoo = criminal

    Tattoo = derelict

    Tattoo = unkempt

    Tattoo = bad

I have had the pleasure of working with some great professionals. And not once did I discern the difference between the tattooed and non-tattooed. I simply made the distinction between a talented and/or trusted colleague and one that is not. And never did the color of their skin, or the presence of non-conservative art sway my opinion of their abilities or the efficacy of their work.

It seems to me that we can fight the good fight when it comes to extinguishing the bigoted brawl of discrimination in regards to race, color, and creed. But when someone has a work of art on their skin we start to question their professionalism? Which means your questioning their professional abilities? You do remember the EEOC?

Oh and the last time I checked,  I have taken care of many ‘older’ patients who have tattoos themselves! Have you ever taken care of veteran? So are we not only going to single out tattooed professionals, but are we also going to differentiate a ‘good’ tattoo vs. a ‘bad’ tattoo??!!

You want to know what the difference is between a tattooed and non-tattooed person?

The tattooed person doesn’t care that you don’t have a tattoo.

Carpe Diem

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8 thoughts on “So How Do I Look?

  1. “The tattooed person doesn’t care that you don’t have a tattoo”
    How True!
    I guess the Tattoo = Criminal clashes with Nurse = Angel…

  2. “The tattooed person doesn’t care that you don’t have a tattoo”
    How True!
    I guess the Tattoo = Criminal clashes with Nurse = Angel…

  3. As a DON, I’ve got to wear “the uniform”, which in my building, is business casual. Summer affords me the option to wear sleeveless tops (it’s Florida, FFS!) and capris. Winter, I wear more suits. Either way, I still have 4 tats, one of them a very prominent and pretty armband on my left upper arm. Here’s the thing–I get more compliments on that armband from patients (most 65 and older). I think that article you linked is bullshit, frankly, and have never once had a family member come to me to complain about a nurse with a tat. When I’m hiring, I don’t even notice them. Great post.

  4. As a DON, I’ve got to wear “the uniform”, which in my building, is business casual. Summer affords me the option to wear sleeveless tops (it’s Florida, FFS!) and capris. Winter, I wear more suits. Either way, I still have 4 tats, one of them a very prominent and pretty armband on my left upper arm. Here’s the thing–I get more compliments on that armband from patients (most 65 and older). I think that article you linked is bullshit, frankly, and have never once had a family member come to me to complain about a nurse with a tat. When I’m hiring, I don’t even notice them. Great post.

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